Jung about death (Face to Face)

“I don’t believe, I must have a reason.”

“It is better for old people to live on, to look forward to the next day, as if he had to spend centuries and then he lives properly. But, when he’s afraid, he doesn’t look forward, he looks back, it petrifies him.  He gets stiff and he dies before his time.”

– Carl Jung

Video description from MayaAtlantis on you-tube:

Face to Face, a 35 episode BBC television series broadcast between 1959 and 1962, was the first program on British television to unmask public figures and show what lies beneath the surface. Harsh lighting and close-up camera angles were employed to capture each flicker of emotion, a method critics referred to as “torture by television.” Among those who submitted to Freeman’s remorseless scrutiny were Evelyn Waugh, Henry Moore, Bertrand Russell, and Carl Gustav Jung.

When Carl Jung consented to be interviewed, the medical community was surprised that this very private figure was suddenly willing to allow an interviewer into his personal space. When the program was first aired in 1959, Jung himself was taken aback at the unexpectedly positive response from the general public. This strong interest in his work inspired Jung to write his final work, Man and His Symbols, his theory of the symbolism of dreams, explained in lay terms so as to be accessible to all who would come seeking answers.

Freeman’s face was almost never shown. Apart from the back of his head, the cameras were concentrated on the subject, sometimes concentrating on a nervously smoked cigarette or a close-up of a face. The theme music was an excerpt from the overture to Berlioz’ opera Les Francs-juges. The titles for each episode featured caricatures of that week’s subject drawn by Feliks Topolski. Some episodes departed from an interview conducted at the BBC’s Lime Grove Studios: the edition with Carl Gustav Jung was conducted at his home in Switzerland. The interview was a success, with his much quoted remark about the existence of God – ‘I don’t believe, I know’ – arousing a storm of comment at the time.

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