JAMA Pediatrics study concludes, “Kids With Fewer Vaccines Have Fewer Doctor and Emergency Room Visits”

Source: Health Impact News

Health Impact News editor reports on JAMA pediatric study that concludes that children who are given fewer vaccines have fewer visits to doctors and emergency rooms.   The editor writes:

“The title of the study is: A Population-Based Cohort Study of Undervaccination in 8 Managed Care Organizations Across the United States – You can read the abstract here. Rather than rely upon the press releases of the study which for the most part were bemoaning the fact that children were not following the national vaccine schedule and therefore representing a threat to the existence of the human race, I decided to spend the $30.00 and download the article to read for myself.”

The JAMA study’s reported results from the abstract:

“Results  Of 323 247 children born between 2004 and 2008, 48.7% were undervaccinated for at least 1 day before age 24 months. The prevalence of undervaccination and specific patterns of undervaccination increased over time (P < .001). In a matched cohort analysis, undervaccinated children had lower outpatient visit rates compared with children who were age-appropriately vaccinated (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.89; 95% CI, 0.89- 0.90). In contrast, undervaccinated children had increased inpatient admission rates compared with age-appropriately vaccinated children (IRR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.18-1.23). In a second matched cohort analysis, children who were undervaccinated because of parental choice had lower rates of outpatient visits (IRR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.93-0.95) and emergency department encounters (IRR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.88-0.94) than age-appropriately vaccinated children.”

The Health Impact News article quotes from the downloaded JAMA study:

“Children who were undervaccinated because of parental choice had significantly lower utilization rates of the ED (emergency department visits) and outpatient settings—both overall and for specific acute illnesses—than children who were vaccinated on time.”

But, here’s the conclusion of the study from the JAMA study Abstract:

“Undervaccination appears to be an increasing trend. Undervaccinated children appear to have different health care utilization patterns compared with age-appropriately vaccinated children.”

Most news reports about this study focus on the increase in unvaccinated children as a concern for society as a whole.  The author sites one such report by Reuters that states:

“Researchers said that trend is cause for concern because if enough kids skip their vaccines, whole schools or communities may be at higher risk for preventable infections such as whooping cough and measles.”

But, in the case of whooping cough, unvaccinated kids were actually shown to fair better than those who were.  The Health Impact News quotes Dr. Mercola on a 2010 study in California:

“The study showed that 81 percent of 2010 California whooping cough cases in people under the age of 18 occurred in those who were fully up to date on the whooping cough vaccine. Eleven percent had received at least one shot, but not the entire recommended series, and only eight percent of those stricken were unvaccinated.”

The Health Impact News report concludes:

Come on those of you in the media! Wake up and do some investigative journalism for once! Pay the $30.00 to get the actual study and see what it really says, instead of just regurgitating the spin from the press release! This is a serious issue!! Just preceding the release of this study today, the Institute of Medicine released a report last week that the vaccination schedule was “safe,” but they offered no new research what-so-ever. (See: Institute of Medicine Concludes Vaccinated versus Unvaccinated Research Not Needed: The Vaccine Schedule is Safe As Is)

Dr. Mercola interviews Barbara Loe Fisher, co-founder and President of the National Vaccine Information Center

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